Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Harmony of the Law - Volume 2 - Enhanced Version (Calvins Commentaries Book 4) file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Harmony of the Law - Volume 2 - Enhanced Version (Calvins Commentaries Book 4) book. Happy reading Harmony of the Law - Volume 2 - Enhanced Version (Calvins Commentaries Book 4) Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Harmony of the Law - Volume 2 - Enhanced Version (Calvins Commentaries Book 4) at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Harmony of the Law - Volume 2 - Enhanced Version (Calvins Commentaries Book 4) Pocket Guide.

A birthday, which ought to have been held sacred, is profaned by the greater part of men with disgraceful abuses; and there is scarcely a single entertainment at all costly that is free from wicked debauchery. First, men drink more freely; next, the door is opened to filthy and immodest conversation; and, lastly, no moderation is observed.

Available formats

This was the reason why the patriarch Job was in the habit of offering sacrifices, while his sons were feasting alternately in each other's houses, Job It was because he thought that, when the guests invite one another to mirth, they are far from maintaining due moderation, and sin in a variety of ways. Thus it happened that Herod, intending to give a rich entertainment to his guests, permitted his wife's daughter to dance.

Hence, too, it appears what sort of discipline existed at his court; for, though most people at that time thought themselves at liberty to dance, yet for a marriageable young woman to dance was a shameful display of the impudence of the strumpet. But the unchaste Herodias had moulded her daughter Salome to her own manners in such a manner that she might not bring disgrace upon her. The wicked murder of a holy prophet. The heat of wine had such an influence on Herod, that, forgetting gravity and prudence, he promised to a dancing girl, that he would give her even to the half of his kingdom.

A shameful example truly, that a drunken king not only permits himself to behold with approbation a spectacle [] which was disgraceful to his family, but holds out such a reward! Let us therefore learn to be careful in anticipating and resisting the devil, lest he entangle us in such snares. And she went out, and said to her mother We need not wonder that Herodias attached so much importance to John's death. It was rather the dread of being cast off that inflamed and tormented her; as it usually happens that, when adulterers are visited with feelings of uneasiness, they become ashamed of their own lust.

But she hoped that this crime would bind Herod more closely to her than ever, if the disgrace of a pretended marriage were washed out by the blood of the prophet. That her power might be more secure for the future, she longed for the death of that man whom she imagined to be her only opponent; and this shows us the wretched anxiety by which a bad conscience is always tormented. John was detained in prison, and the haughty and cruel woman might have issued orders that no man should converse with or approach him; and yet she has no rest, but is oppressed with anxiety and alarm, till the prophet be removed out of the way.

This likewise serves to show the power of the word of God, that the voice of the holy man, even when shut up in prison, wounds and tortures in the keenest manner the mind of the king's wife. And the king being sorry. His heart, as we have said, was no longer influenced by religious sentiments; but, foreseeing the detestation that will be excited by such a crime, he dreads both the loss of character and positive harm, and consequently repents of his levity.

And yet he has not the courage to give a refusal to a dancing girl, lest he should incur the reproach of unsteadiness; as if it were more dishonorable to retract a rash and foolish promise than to persist in a heinous crime. With the wonted vanity of kings, he does not choose that what he has once uttered shall be recalled, and orders that the prophet shall be instantly slain. We infer that Herod was at that time supping in the castle of Macherus, where, Josephus tells us, John was imprisoned, Ant. On account of the oath, and of those who sat at table with him. It deserves our attention that the Evangelists state this to be the reason of his grief; and hence we infer that, though he had sworn a hundred times, yet if there had been no witness, he would not have held by his oath.

Join Kobo & start eReading today

No inward feelings of religion constrained Herod to do this, but the mere love of power drove him headlong; for he reckoned that he would sink in the estimation of those who were present, if he did not fulfill his engagement. Thus it frequently happens that ungodly men fail to perform their duty, because they do not look to God, but are only intent on this object, that they may not incur the reproaches of men.

First, he was deeply in fault for such haste in swearing; for the design of an oath is to confirm a promise in a doubtful matter. Next, when it appeared that he could not be relieved from his engagement without involving himself in an aggravated crime, he had no right to implicate the sacred name of God in such wickedness; for what could be more at variance with the nature of God than to lend his countenance to a shocking murder? If a private loss is at stake, let him who has made a rash oath suffer the punishment of his folly; but, when a man has taken the name of God in vain, let him beware of doubling his guilt by employing this as a pretense for committing some enormous crime.

Hence it follows, that monastic vows, which are attended by open impiety, do not bind the conscience any more than the enchantments of magicians; for it is not the will of God that his sacred name shall give support to what is sinful. But this passage teaches us, that we ought to beware of making promises without consideration; and next, that lightness must not be followed by obstinacy. And gave it to the girl. It was an additional aggravation of this detestable crime, that the head of the holy man was made, after his death, a matter of sport.

But in this way the Lord sometimes gives up his people to the pride of wicked men, till he at length makes it evident that their blood is precious in his sight Psalm Herodias is delighted with the thought of having gained her wicked purpose, and cruelly triumphs over her reprover; but when afterwards, stripped of her wealth, and not only deprived of the title of queen, but driven from her native country, and destitute of all means of support, she dragged out a wretched life in poverty and banishment, she presented a spectacle gratifying to angels and to all good people.

When we perceive that the guests are compelled to pollute their eyes by beholding this detestable exhibition, let us learn from it, that those who sit at the tables of kings are often involved in many crimes; for, granting that the table is not stained by murder, every thing partakes so largely of all sorts of wickedness, that they who approach to it must be at least given up to debauchery. His disciples came. One thing only remained to complete the woman's cruelty. It was, to leave the corpse of the holy man unburied; for there is reason to believe that, when his disciples performed this duty, the attendants of the tyrant had thrown out the corpse.

Though the honor of burial is of no importance to the dead, yet it is the will of the Lord that we should observe this ceremony as a token of the last resurrection; and therefore God was pleased with the carefulness which was manifested by the disciples, when they came to commit to the tomb the body of their master. Moreover, it was an attestation of their piety; for in this way they declared that the doctrine of their master continued to have a firm hold of their hearts after his death. This confession was therefore worthy of praise, more especially as it was not without danger; for they could not do honor to a man who had been put to death by the executioner without exciting against themselves the rage of the tyrant.

Mark Therefore Herodias had a quarrel against him, and would have killed him; but she could not: Mark For Herod feared John, knowing that he was a just man and an holy, and observed him; and when he heard him, he did many things, and heard him gladly. Mark And when a convenient day was come, that Herod on his birthday made a supper to his lords, high captains, and chief estates of Galilee; Mark And when the daughter of the said Herodias came in, and danced, and pleased Herod and them that sat with him, the king said unto the damsel, Ask of me whatsoever thou wilt, and I will give it thee.

Mark And he sware unto her, Whatsoever thou shalt ask of me, I will give it thee, unto the half of my kingdom. Mark And she went forth, and said unto her mother, What shall I ask? Mark And she came in straightway with haste unto the king, and asked, saying, I will that thou give me by and by in a charger the head of John the Baptist.

Mark And the king was exceeding sorry; yet for his oath's sake, and for their sakes which sat with him, he would not reject her. Mark And immediately the king sent an executioner, and commanded his head to be brought: and he went and beheaded him in the prison, Mark And brought his head in a charger, and gave it to the damsel: and the damsel gave it to her mother. Mark And when his disciples heard of it , they came and took up his corpse, and laid it in a tomb. Mark And the apostles gathered themselves together unto Jesus, and told him all things, both what they had done, and what they had taught.

Mark Matthew Mark Luke When Jesus heard this, he departed thence to a ship to a desert place apart; and when the multitudes heard it, they followed him on foot out of the cities. And Jesus, when leaving the ship, saw a great multitude, and was moved with compassion towards them, and healed of such of them as were diseased.

harmony in Antiquarian & Collectable | eBay

And when the evening was drawing on, his disciples came to him, saying, It is a desert place, and the time is now past: send the multitudes away, that they may go into the village, and purchase victuals for themselves. And Jesus said to them, It is not necessary that they should go away: give you to them something to eat. And they say to him, We have nothing here but five loaves and two fishes. And he said, Bring them hither to me.

And he commanded the multitudes to sit down on the grass, and, taking the five loaves and the two fishes, and raising his eyes to heaven, he blessed. And they all ate, and were satisfied, and carried away what remained of the fragments [] twelve baskets full. And they who had eaten were nearly five thousand men, besides women and children.

Harmony of the Law - Volume 2

And the Apostles assembled to Jesus, and related to him all things, both what they had done and what they had taught. And he said to them, Come you apart into a desert place, and rest for a little. For there were many who were coming and going, so that there was not even leisure to take food. And he went into a desert place by ship apart. And the multitude saw them departing, and many recognized him, and ran hither on foot out of all the cities, and went before them, and came together to him.

And Jesus, as he was leaving the ship, saw a great multitude, and was moved with compassion towards them, because they were as sheep not having a shepherd, and he began to teach them many things. And when a great part of the day was already past, his disciples came to him, saying, It is a desert place, and the day is now far advanced.

John Calvin

Send them away, that they may go into the surrounding towns and villages and purchase bread for themselves; for they having nothing to eat. And he answering said to them, Give you to them something to eat. And they said to him Shall we go and purchase bread for two hundred pence, and give them something to eat?

patrimoinenature.be/includes/logiciel/dtecter-logiciel-espion-sur-iphone-7.php And he said to them, How many loaves have you? Go and see. And he commanded them to make them all sit down, arranging the guests on the green grass. And they sat down, arranged in hundreds, and fifties. And when he had taken the five loaves and the two fishes, raising his eyes to heaven, he blessed, [] and brake the loaves, and gave to the disciples to set before them, and divided the two fishes among them all.

And they all ate, and were satisfied. And they carried away twelve baskets full of the fragments and of the fishes. Now they who had eaten were about five thousand men. And the Apostles, having returned, [] related to him all that they had done.

And he took them, and withdrew apart into a desert place, near a city which is called Bethsaida. And when the multitudes knew it, they followed him; and he received them, and spoke to them about the kingdom of God, and healed those who needed healing. And the day began to decline; and the twelve approached and said to him, Send away the multitudes, that they may go into the neighboring towns and villages, and procure food; for we are here in a desert place.

And he said to them, Give you to them something to eat. And they said, We have no more than five loaves and two fishes; unless we go and buy food for all this people. Now they were about five thousand men. And he saith to his disciples, Make them sit down, fifty in each division. And they did so, and made them all sit down.


  • John King : D&R'da | D&R - Kültür, Sanat ve Eğlence Dünyası.
  • Harmony of the Law - Volume 2 - Christian Classics Ethereal Library.
  • Randolph Field (Images of America).

And, taking the five loaves and the two fishes, he raised his eyes to heaven, and blessed them, and broke them, [] and gave them to the disciples to set before the multitude. And they all ate, and were satisfied; and there was carried away what was left of the fragments twelve baskets. When Jesus heard it. John, who relates the same narrative, does not mention the reason why Jesus crossed over to the opposite bank, 6: 5.